What is the modern definition of psychology

psychology

term

Experiential science, the subject of which is human experience and behavior. Historically, the roots of psychology go back to antiquity (Aristotle: "From the soul") and can be found above all in philosophy and theology. As a modern empirical science, psychology was formed in the middle of the 19th century primarily as a natural science. A first professorship for psychology was filled with W. Wundt at the University of Leipzig in 1879. The professionalization of psychology took place in the middle of the 20th century, to which in Germany the introduction of a professional qualification course (diploma psychologist) and the establishment of a relevant professional association (Professional Association of German Psychologists (BDP)) contributed.

In psychology one differentiates between one
(1) Theoretical Psychology conducting basic research, a
(2) Questions from the application fields of applied psychology and a
(3) on a scientific basis routinely problems in practice-solving practical psychology.

Sub-areas

As far as its basic conceptions are concerned, psychology is a heterogeneous science. Next to each other are approaches that are theoretically and methodologically different.

1. A scientific orientation is based on physics, works largely experimentally and tries to formulate general laws as mathematically as possible.

2. Psychology as part of biology sees humans as a mammal alongside others, whose modes of experience and behavior were formed in the course of evolution through mutation and selection; Particular attention is paid to the physiological foundations of psychological processes.

3. Psychology as a humanities emphasizes the uniqueness of the personality and seeks to comprehensively understand its experience and behavior using hermeneutic methods. Psychology as a social science is based on sociology, interprets individual experience and behavior as the result of a socialization process and sees the person accordingly shaped by their learning history.

approaches

Psychology as a social science is based on sociology, interprets individual experience and behavior as the result of a socialization process and sees the person accordingly shaped by their learning history.