Why do people stop playing musical instruments

Music makes you healthy

Status: 06/25/2018 11:40 a.m. | archive
Music can relieve pain.

Music not only sounds beautiful, it is also good for your health and can even aid healing. The reason for these forces lies in the brain, because music stimulates what is known as neuroplasticity, i.e. the brain's ability to change its structures throughout its life. This is important, for example, for people whose brain has been damaged, for example after a stroke or brain tumor. Thanks to neuroplasticity, healthy regions in the brain can often take over the functions of the damaged areas. The nerve cells and nerve cell pathways simply look for other paths and reconnect.

Making music stimulates brain activity

Making music is particularly suitable for this, because studies have shown that the interplay of moving, hearing and planning is particularly stimulating for people who play an instrument and occupies several brain regions at the same time.

Sonification therapy: setting movements to music

Sonification therapy also makes use of this: Here, movements are set to music using sensors on the arms or legs, which effectively support the patient in relearning these processes. Even with a loss of speech (aphasia), music can help by means of singing, in order to enable access to speech piece by piece.

Music arouses emotions

Since music, in addition to coordination, also arouses emotions in us, associated ailments such as pain can also be influenced. That is why music is also used in pain therapy, which ensures that subjectively felt pain is significantly alleviated. The genre of music itself does not matter. The main thing is that you like the music.

Experts on the subject

Prof. Dr. Eckart Altenm├╝ller
Musician, neurophysiologist and neuropsychologist
Schiffgraben 48, 30175 Hanover
(0511) 310 05 53

Dr. Fiona Rohlffs
Assistant doctor
Clinic and Polyclinic for Vascular Medicine
University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
Martinistrasse 22
20246 Hamburg
(040) 741 00
www.uke.de

Dr. Daniel Scholz
Musician, psychologist, neurologist
University of Music, Theater and Media, Hanover
Emmichplatz 1
30175 Hanover
(0511) 310 01
www.hmtm-hannover.de/

Prof. Dr. Eike Sebastian Debus
Clinic Director
Clinic and Polyclinic for Vascular Medicine
University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf
Martinistrasse 22
20246 Hamburg
(040) 741 00
www.uke.de/

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Visit | 06/26/2018 | 8:15 pm