Which countries are accepting Syrian refugees?

Europe

According to the UNHCR, of the 23 million refugees and asylum seekers worldwide at the end of 2017, 7.4 million were in 46 European countries, including 3.2 million in an EU member state. With 3.8 million people, more than half of all refugees and asylum seekers in Europe came from Turkey (51.2 percent). In second place was Germany with 1.4 million refugees and asylum seekers (18.9 percent). This was followed by France (400 thousand), Italy (354 thousand), Sweden (293 thousand) and Austria (172 thousand). In relation to its own population, Turkey has also taken in the most refugees and asylum seekers in Europe (end of 2017: 47.5 per 1,000 inhabitants). This was followed by Sweden (29.3), Malta (20.4), Austria (19.6), Cyprus (17.6) and Germany (17.0). On the other hand, there were fewer than one refugee or asylum seeker per 1,000 inhabitants in 20 of the 46 European countries - including eleven EU countries.

Facts

According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the number of people affected by displacement and displacement reached a record level in 2017 - in the UNHCR area alone it was more than 71 million. These included around 39 million people who were displaced within their country as well as almost 23 million refugees and asylum seekers. Of the 23 million refugees and asylum seekers worldwide at the end of 2017, 7.4 million were in the 46 European countries for which the UNHCR provides data (see table below). Less than half of them - 3.2 million - lived in one of the 28 member states of the European Union (EU).

With 3.8 million people at the end of 2017, more than half of all refugees and asylum seekers in Europe were in Turkey (51.2 percent). In second place was Germany with a share of 18.9 percent. At the same time, the 1.4 million refugees and asylum seekers in Germany represented 43.1 percent of all refugees and asylum seekers in the EU-28. This was followed within the EU by France (400 thousand), Italy (354 thousand), Sweden (293 thousand), Austria (172 thousand), the United Kingdom (162 thousand) and the Netherlands (110 thousand). Outside the EU, Russia (128,000) and Switzerland (117,000) each took in more than 100,000 refugees and asylum seekers in Europe.

In relation to its own population, Turkey has also taken in the most refugees and asylum seekers in Europe (end of 2017: 47.5 per 1,000 inhabitants). This was followed by Sweden (29.3), Malta (20.4), Austria (19.6), Cyprus (17.6), Germany (17.0), Switzerland (13.9) and Norway (11.8 ). On the other hand, there were fewer than one refugee or asylum seeker per 1,000 inhabitants in 20 of the 46 countries examined at the end of 2017 - including the EU countries Estonia, Croatia, Latvia, Lithuania, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, the Czech Republic and Hungary.

If the binational movements of refugees and asylum seekers are considered, the movement between Syria as the country of origin and Turkey as the host country is the largest movement between two individual countries with 3.4 million refugees and asylum seekers (as of the end of 2017). This was followed by movements between Syria and Germany (509 thousand), Afghanistan / Turkey (163 thousand), Iraq / Turkey (153 thousand), Iraq / Germany (137 thousand) and between Ukraine and Russia (125 thousand). ).

In addition to the movements of refugees and asylum seekers between two countries, the UNHCR also records people who have been affected by flight and displacement within their own country. The number of internally displaced persons in Ukraine was around 1.8 million at the end of 2017. Azerbaijan (613 thousand), Georgia (278 thousand), Serbia and Kosovo (217 thousand) and Bosnia and Herzegovina (99 thousand) followed as further European countries. There were no internally displaced persons in the EU countries at the end of 2017.

Data Source

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR): Global Trends 2017; Eurostat: online database: population (05/2018)

Terms, methodological notes or reading aids

More information about the binational movements of refugees and asylum seekers you'll find here...

Information on the subject Flight and displacement worldwide you'll find here...

Information on the subject Asylum in Germany you'll find here...

Unless otherwise stated, all information relates to persons within the UNHCR area of ​​responsibility; refugees excluding internally displaced persons, returnees or people in refugee-like situations. Both Asylum seekers only pending proceedings are considered.

The most important international convention on refugee protection is the 1951 Geneva Refugee Convention, which was supplemented by a protocol in 1967. Article 1 of the Geneva Refugee Convention defines one refugee as a person who is outside the country of which he is a national or in which he is permanently resident and who has a well-founded fear of persecution because of his or her race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or because of political convictions and cannot avail himself of the protection of this land or cannot return there because of this fear of persecution.

The United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) protects and supports refugees around the world. UNHCR was founded in 1951 by the UN General Assembly to help millions of European refugees in the aftermath of World War II. In the following decades the area of ​​responsibility was steadily expanded.