Why is Japanese food popular

10 must-try dishes in Japan

Table of Contents

  1. sushi
  2. Ramen
  3. Tempura
  4. Kaiseki
  5. Unagi
  6. Shabu-Shabu
  7. Soba
  8. Okonmiyaki
  9. Tonkatsu
  10. Yakitori

Japanese cuisine is often characterized by fish and little fat. The reason for this lies in the past of the traditional country. For more than a thousand years, the people of Japan were banned from eating meat and slaughtering animals. Fish and seafood were the exception. Over the years, both the recipes and the taste of the Japanese have developed in a low-fat direction.

1. Sushi

Everyone knows it - most of them love it. The trend food has been adapted so strongly to our western palates around the world that almost everyone who likes rice can now also eat sushi. In Japan, sushi is almost never served at home, but is a typical restaurant dish. In addition, the rolls are eaten with the hands and only the fish side is dipped into the soy sauce, but never with the rice side. You can find out how you can make sushi yourself here.

2. Ramen

Ramen is a traditional Japanese noodle soup. It originally comes from China and is now prepared in different regions in Japan. The soup usually consists of a strong broth, ramen noodles and some fresh ingredients such as meat, fish or vegetables. In the meantime, more and more fresh ramen are being served here in Germany and you no longer have to resort to the instant version.

3. Tempura

Tempura is also a very classic dish in Japanese cuisine. Here meat, fish or vegetables are fried in neutral oil or sesame oil and served as an accompaniment to rice. The small bites are dipped in soy sauce, sweet chilli or ginger dips - a real treat that shouldn't be left out.

4. Kaiseki

The Japanese eat up to five meals a day. Kaiseki is often served in the afternoon for tea. A compilation of small, light dishes that everyone can help themselves to. They are not heavy in the stomach and are often so artistically arranged that the eye can literally eat with them!

5. Unagi

Unagi is the Japanese word for eel and a very special fish specialty in Japan. The eel is cooked using a complex process and thereby loses a large part of its fat content. In terms of taste, eel is definitely not for everyone, but this Japanese dish is also nutritious and healthy!

6. Shabu-Shabu

This sociable dish is a broth fondue and is very similar to our New Year's Eve meat fondue. But here, too, the Japanese prove that there are also healthy variants: The meat or fish is not cooked in hot fat, but in a spicy broth or just in water. Finally, the entire contents of the pot are filled with noodles and eaten as soup.

7. Soba

Soba noodles are made from buckwheat and have traditionally been eaten where rice does not find a good breeding ground: in the mountains. There is no standard dish for this ingredient, but the noodles are usually cooked in broth. Then it can be made into a soup or the noodles can be consumed pure. Today, soba is often found in various varieties in fast-food restaurants in Japan.

8. Okonmiyaki

Okonmiyaki are pancake-like flat cakes that are usually cooked right at the table on a hot iron plate. They mostly consist of flour, cabbage, egg, water and dashi. Depending on the region, a wide variety of ingredients are added. The dish comes from the Kansai region and is similarly found on the menu in Tokyo under the name Monjayaki.

9. Tonkatsu

A rare example of a Japanese dish that features pork. It consists of a pork chop, which is rolled in panko, the Japanese breadcrumbs, and then fried. This dish is strikingly similar to the classic Wiener Schnitzel, but the way it is seasoned becomes a real Japanese pleasure dish!

10. Yakitori

The delicious chicken skewers are often grilled in street restaurants in Japan. Usually only salt or a soy sauce mix is ​​served. The Japanese generally don't spice up their meals, as we often do in Europe. The freshness and taste of the products should still be palpable in Japanese cuisine.