Church bells are exempt from noise protection regulations

In the Swiss town of Bischofszell, 21 people had filed legal complaints against the ringing of bells at night because it deprived them of sleep. After a long-term noise measurement, the bells of the Catholic Church will no longer ring at night in the future, the bells of the Evangelical Church only every hour.

Around 6,000 people live in the small community of Bischofszell in the canton of Thurgau. Some of them in the old town, where the Catholic St. Pelasius Church and the Protestant Johanneskirche have so far broken the night's sleep with bells. 21 residents reimbursed, according to information from fm1today, on the other hand, legal notice. A long-term noise measurement carried out as a result came to the conclusion that the bell noise in the lower old town had a "considerable" to "very disruptive" effect and could trigger wake-up reactions.

Although the city council actually wanted to stick to the nightly chime, solutions had to be found to protect a restful night's sleep. Since structural measures for the churches were out of the question, the bells of the Evangelical Church will "only" strike every hour instead of every quarter hour and the bells of the Catholic Church - weighing between 400 and 5,000 kilos - are completely silent at night. In the morning the Catholic Church will not ring for prayer until seven, half an hour later than before.

In Germany, too, residents are repeatedly successful in their fight against the noise of bells. The chimes of the church bells are excluded from the Noise Protection Ordinance, but they are not inviolable. Numerous municipalities have also succeeded in stopping the ringing at night or, as happened recently in North Rhine-Westphalia, in shortening the ringing time. The ringing is specified in the ringing order of the respective municipality, so that the municipality can also take into account the (sleep) needs of the residents. While some Church employees declare the bell to be "common cultural property", others are open to changes in the bell protocol.

39 comments

Comments

Gerhard Baierlein at the permanent link

How can you let yourself be fooled by an association whose "cultural asset" used to include torturing and killing people in the cruelest way, just because that is no longer in vogue, you have to

constantly bothered by their church bells?
Community councils should also get an overall picture, including the history of the churches, before they crouch in front of them.
We all owe NOTHING to the churches, but the churches owe us!

Alex on the permanent link

And soon the prayer tongues turned out to be forever. Thank god or whoever. A muezzin is not allowed to blast off the minaret every hour as he likes.

The church bark can finally fall silent - amen.

Hans Trutnau at the permanent link

In return, the priests may now come with the request to continue to observe the tomb on Cooking Friday ...

Manfred Schleyer at the Permanent Link

But then Jesus will be very sad. Blink!

Peter Scheiwiller at the permanent link

I think it's a shame that the bells are no longer allowed to ring at night. I live right next to the church.

Although I am not a regular churchgoer, the bells were always very nice and gave a feeling of home. Nobody seems to mind that the street and the pub on the other side of the house are a lot more annoying noise. I find this development very worrying.

M.S. at Permanent Link

You are free to install the appropriate sound system in your apartment. Why should others be deprived of sleep for their sense of home? Pretty selfish.

Peter Scheiwiller at the permanent link

That is hardly selfish. Whoever lives next to a church should be aware that church bells are ringing there too. After all, that's been the case for centuries.

If you don't like that, you shouldn't settle down next to such a church. It's kind of logical. But if a pub that was previously not a garden pub suddenly decides to host 1 or 2 guests outside in practically any weather until night, it cannot be foreseen. Road noise has also increased by around 50% in the last 10 years. In addition, certain drivers consciously step on the gas to cause even more noise. I call that selfish and are phenomena that couldn't really be predicted. So I could understand that neighbors are upset about the ringing of bells
would if their house was there in front of the church.

Damian S. at the permanent link

Uh? This is again atheist / humanist logic: why do you stand up for the fact that other people are not allowed to believe in God and the Church? That is probably rather selfish!

Fortunately, just because you don't believe in God doesn't mean that everyone has to think that way. You'd better put a sack of potatoes on your head, then you don't have to see the Pope anymore.

Bernd Kammermeier at the permanent link

"This is atheist / humanist logic again: Why do you stand up for the fact that other people are not allowed to believe in God and the Church?"

Which atheist and which humanist acts against Articles 4 and 5 of the Basic Law? At least from the sensible ones. Believe everything, but don't expect others to get down on their knees and show respect because of your private ideas. Anyone who wants to believe in the rites of a Near Eastern pastoral culture should do so - along with all the miracle stories.

But you are not allowed to force this on anyone (Art. 140 GG). So ringing bells may be traditional, but there are three reasons for this tradition: 1. to announce the time, 2. to call believers to worship, and 3. to ring to commemorate Christian holidays.

Re 1 .: There are now a variety of methods of finding out the time. So this purpose is obsolete. Especially at night the acoustic display of the time is superfluous.

To 2 .: In a society that has less than 50% denominational Christians in three years, the invitation to worship is superfluous and violates Article 140 of the Basic Law.

Regarding 3: This is also of interest to a minority in Germany at best. The invitation to commemorate, which is closely related to religion, also violates the Basic Law.

Of course, nobody sees it that closely these days and most of them don't give a damn. But the fact remains that religious statements that are unmistakably spread hurt my atheistic feelings ...

Damian S. at the permanent link

Well-roared Leo, at least for a brutal atheist. But this hurts my Christian religious feelings and I don't like that at all!

The church (including its sublime sound of bells) remains in the village. Point.

Bernd Kammermeier at the permanent link

It hurts my atheistic feelings that your Christian-religious feelings are hurt and you insist on your position because of it. Tomorrow at 6 in the morning behind the cemetery wall? Pistol or sword ...?

Damian S. at the permanent link

Ok i will be there. Are you the kind of person who shoots an unarmed man in the back?

Paul at the permanent link

The pilgrimage church in the Ramersdorf district of Munich had to get by for three years and eleven months because of renovation work without bells ringing, and some of the services were held in a tent.

The "calling to church service" with bells is therefore dispensable.

Fake pole at the permanent link

The road is noisy as a physical side effect of its function that is difficult to avoid. Nevertheless, one tries to limit this. The Bimmelt Pots, on the other hand, are loud on purpose.

You have to ask yourself why the churches have not yet come up with the idea of ​​burning the area in addition to the tinkling in order to outdo the street with the fine dust and toxins pollution.

Damian S. at the permanent link

Mr. Scheiwiller, I sympathize with you. That is what happens when the Church is abolished and the Christian faith is restricted or even banned. Would you like to live in a world like that?

I do not think so. Neither do I, by the way. The atheists / humanists must not be given too much power, but must be steered into Christian channels.

Gerhard Baierlein at the permanent link

Mr. Damian S. & Mr. Scheinwiller, indoctrination from childhood on is not an option, because it blocks logical thinking per se.

Please do not answer, it is pointless to argue with stubborn people like the two of you.

Scheiwiller at the permanent link

Dear Mr. Baierlein
I'm not so sure you got it right.

So again explained very simply. Anyone who pulls next to a church or so that they understand what it is about next to, let's say a well-frequented nightclub and then wonders why one hears something at night is not yet ready to think logically. For myself, I deliberately settled next to a church because I like the sound of bells. If you don't like that, you better not move next to a church. In America a sign might have to be put up next to a church that would read: Beware, the church bells ring.

Damian S. at the permanent link

Very nicely explained, Mr. Scheiwiller. I'm just afraid that Mr. Baierlein doesn't understand that either (wants to understand?) And continues to live in his atheistic ivory tower.

But it doesn't matter, luckily it didn't turn out all over the place. In any case, in my village the church is still standing and ringing majestically to itself. As it should be for a Christian church, these atheists / humanists can say what they want, they are only a loud and completely insignificant minority anyway. I won't let them destroy my faith and my sense of home.

Bernd Kammermeier at the permanent link

"... these atheists / humanists can say what they want, they are only a loud and completely insignificant minority anyway."

The fact is: in two or three years, denominational Christians will be a minority. When you consider that many are forced to be members of one of the faith corporations in order to get a job, they are actually a smaller minority. If I take the belief in Christian cinnabar as a basis, they are a vanishing minority with around 12% of the population.

"I won't let them destroy my faith and my sense of home."

Nobody wants that either. But your belief shouldn't be so intrusive that anyone who doesn't want to hear it has to notice. If there was a mosque in your idyll and the muezzin regularly called to prayer over loudspeakers, I would like to play little mouse in your reaction. Would you then defend it so vehemently ...?

Damian S. at the permanent link

Who are you, then? And why so aggressive? Or have we shaken your anti-Christian worldview, which consists only of hatred, rejection, discrimination and exclusion?

I, on the other hand, have empathy and empathy and can understand Mr. Scheinwiller so well. I live in a rural area and also love the church bells, which are a piece of home for me. I only become aggressive when I hear anti-Christian ideas coming from atheistic mouths. I would chase you out of my village with my dung fork, Mr. Baierlein!

Gerhard Baierlein at the permanent link

Yes, my two bell lovers, they are the only ones who like the tinkling and like all Christians they react with the threat of violence, they will NEVER understand what a humanist and atheist really means, de

r is only committed to global peace.
Hatred, rejection and discrimination are definitely not attributes of atheists and if you are aggressive, with all due respect, you do not actually notice that by threatening to chase me out of your village with a pitchfork.
The history of Christianity is one string of murder and manslaughter, persecution and executions, if you only wanted you could have fact-based evidence
research, but that would collapse your false, Christian worldview.
Than eyes and ears closed and so on until the bitter end.

With humanistic greetings
G.B.

Klaus at the permanent link

Uiuiui, there's a lot going on here again. But that's how I like it, a lively discussion between supporters and opponents of the church or atheists / humanists.

What we need now is an overarching identity to tame the dispute. No, even better, respect from and for the other side. Then we could empirically test the rejection-respect model of tolerance.

Gerhard Baierlein at the permanent link

Hello Klaus, you write, Atheists / Humanists>

Every humanist is always also an atheist, since he does not believe in ghosts, but every atheist is not automatically a humanist, so there is no conflict between the two.

Paul at the permanent link

And, Mr. Damian, don't tell yourself that you didn't mean the pitchfork seriously!

The bottom line is your state of mind, which came to light with this statement, the same arrogance and arrogance that occurs in bishops and cardinals.

Bernd Kammermeier at the permanent link

"And why so aggressive?"

What's wrong with you? Let's see how far your charity goes:

"Or have we shaken your anti-Christian worldview, which consists only of hatred, rejection, discrimination and exclusion?"

So an "anti-Christian worldview" (whatever that is) consists "only of hatred, rejection, discrimination and exclusion"?

I. E. someone who is critical of Christianity (which seems understandable in view of its cruel history) is filled with "hatred" and "rejects" (presumably Christians), "discriminates" them and "margins" them? You are welcome to see yourself in the role of victim, as a martyr even suffering from the persecution of Christians. But that doesn't happen in reality.

Conversely, it becomes a shoe: for centuries, charitable Christians have persecuted, murdered, expropriated and expelled so-called "godless", "heretics" or "people of different faith" down to the blood. All the attributes that you assign to the "anti-Christianism" you imagine - namely hatred, rejection, discrimination and exclusion - apply 100% to Christianity in 95% of its history.

"I, on the other hand, have empathy and empathy and can understand Mr. Scheinwiller so well."

Someone who criticizes rational people in such a historically wrong and completely unfounded manner should be empathetic and have empathy? That I don't laugh!

"I only get aggressive when I hear anti-Christian ideas coming from atheistic mouths. I would chase you out of my village with my dung fork, Mr. Baierlein!"

Here you fully reveal your character. It should be like the old days. Hurray, the pyre is burning again in the idyllic village. Hallelujah, we hunt them again, impale them, the godless fellows ...

I'm sorry, Mr. S. We are now in the 21st century. "Hate, rejection, discrimination and exclusion" are over. We now have democracy and a constitution. Christians are no longer allowed to do what they want. They too now have to adhere to equal laws. Belief in ghosts is on the decline, disappearing into history after 1,700 years of Christian tyranny. Nevertheless, you may indulge in it - provided it is peaceful and not penetrative - the law will not take away any seculars from you. However, financed purely privately.

But you should get used to another language. Or should we now also write sentences like this ?: "Or have we shaken your Christian worldview, which consists only of child fucking, taxpayers cupping, inhuman law promotion and student idiocy?"

Paul at the permanent link

Why, of all things, in Christian channels? And not Buddhist or Hindu or Islamic or ...?

As a result of early childhood indoctrination, obviously "Christian" is the only thing you can imagine.

"God" should finally tell EVERYONE in the world WHICH religion "He" wants, so that this spitefulness ceases a la "who believe something wrong". Since "God" has not done this for centuries, he probably doesn't care what people believe, or: ... "God" does not exist at all ?!

Then there is no need for church bells.

Damian S. at the permanent link

Or God cannot be grasped at all for the human mind, since "He" is a higher being.

Then church bells are needed to call this “supra-worldly” God worldly into consciousness. And where it is worldly, it is cozy. There is home, there you settle down.

Bernd Kammermeier at the permanent link

Since there is no God, it must have turned out ...

Damian S. at the permanent link

I can only quote your comment: "You can believe everything, but you must not expect others to get down on their knees and show respect because of your private ideas."

Heistic, dull minority have no respect, do not fall on your knees before “humanistic reason” and shout loudly and with full conviction into the world “Of course there is a God!”. I also enjoy the Christian bells that ring every day (and night) despite modern clocks. The pious Christian life is glorious!

Bernd Kammermeier at the permanent link

"... and shout loudly and with full conviction into the world" Of course there is a God! "."

You are welcome to do that, but do not expect to be taken seriously by the majority in this country. To be smiled at pityingly - okay ...

Damian S. at the permanent link

Don't worry, I don't expect that. Article 5 paragraph 1 in the Basic Law (right to freedom of expression) legitimizes my actions.

Yes, Herr Kammermeier, I am also very familiar with the laws in this papal state.

Paul at the permanent link

"Of course there is a God!"

How do you KNOW that? Or just because you were TOLD orally and in writing, do you just MEAN that "he" exists? Do you also believe all of the explanations found in the scriptures of the Inca, Maya, and other earlier cultures? No? Why not?

Paul at the permanent link

"And a voice rang out from heaven and God spoke ..."

That's what the Bible says. At that time, "He" could turn to a large crowd at the same time and give instructions acoustically, the ascribed property of "higher being" was apparently no obstacle.

For centuries, "He" has not wanted or been able to. Why? Perhaps he died, and at that time "he" only meant to be "eternal".

Rüdiger Kramer at the permanent link

The chime comes from a time when there were no private clocks. Today anyone who wants to go to church can be expected to look at their watch. There are more or less in every household.

Thus, indicating a ring for the time has become completely pointless.

Damian S. at the permanent link

Just as senseless as the atheist scene and the "humanists" (a completely senseless and misleading term, by the way - sect would be more appropriate).

Bernd Kammermeier at the permanent link

Where does this hatred come from with you? Read too much in the Bible ...?

Damian S. at the permanent link

No, too many bad experiences with atheists / humanists in the past. So bad that I am now vehemently positioning myself on the other side. And the "loud and proud"!

Peter Scheiwiller at the permanent link